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    ARE WE BEATING MALARIA? A FIVE-YEAR RETROSPECTIVE STUDY FROM A HOSPITAL IN ENUGU, NIGERIA DISAGREES.

  • subjectCategory: Pathology
  • access_time13 November, 2016
  • keyboard_arrow_downRead Abstract

    In endemic regions of malaria, the actual incidence and mortality rates are unknown due to incomplete reporting. Major factor against this is the irritating sampling technique (finger prick, etc) which are repulsing to the volunteers - that then becomes reluctant - necessitating need for a more accurate estimate through clinical malaria. A total of 27100 medical records of in- and out-patients for laboratory investigations (January 2005 - December 2009) were critically studied. Ages, sexes, occupations, locations, monthly plus yearly incidences of diagnosed cases of malaria were analyzed. Result revealed a yearly statistically significant steady increase in number of diagnosed cases of malaria from 2005 to 2009 (38%, 39%, 42%, 43% and 42%, in ascending order, respectively). An average of 41% (11,119) incidence over the 5 years, as against 19.1% (mere 489) for all the other parasitic diseases, was also recorded. Prevalence was highest during the drier periods of the years. > 35 years age-group has the highest incidence. Females (52.17%) were diagnosed more of malaria than males (47.83%). Likewise, farmers and cattle herdsmen were most diagnosed of the disease. In conclusion, there was still a big, serious lag in the efforts in combating malaria. It is recommended that patients should be quarantine as is done for some diseases, until they are Plasmodium-parasitaemianegative and not only when they are physically fit.  

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